Coates & Davenport, P.C.

Posts tagged "Estate Planning"

Estate planning for high-conflict families

Family relationships are complicated, and many families in Virginia have their fair share of squabbles. However, when it comes to estate planning, family feuds can complicate matters. A person might want to name some relatives as heirs but not others, or an heir might contest a will they feel is unfair. Fighting can also come up during difficult emotional times, such as having to make medical decisions for an incapacitated loved one. Executing an estate plan in a high-conflict family takes care.

Why might one include a special needs trust in their estate plan?

Raising a special needs child is an act of love, and many parents in Virginia who find themselves in such a situation want to do all they can to make sure their special needs child lives life to its fullest. However, parents of special needs children may be concerned about how their child will be cared for once the child is grown and the parents are no longer able or alive to care for the child. One way to address this scenario is through proper estate planning, and for many this includes the execution of a special needs trust.

Have you and your parents planned for long-term care needs?

According to the U.S. government’s Administration on Aging, there is a 70 percent likelihood that individuals age 65 and older will need some sort of long-term care. Despite this staggering statistic, many people fail to plan for long-term care needs.

Why would I want to include a revocable trust in my estate plan?

People executing an estate plan have a lot of options to consider. One estate planning tool that many people in Virginia find useful is a revocable trust. A person (known as the grantor) can execute a revocable trust but, as the name implies, retains the ability to change the provisions of the trust during their lifetime if they wish. The grantor's assets will be placed in the trust during his or her lifetime. Then, when the grantor passes away, the trust becomes irrevocable and assets are distributed to the grantor's heirs per the terms of the trust.

How does a remarriage affect one's estate plan?

According to the Census Bureau, approximately 17 percent of people in the U.S. will marry a second time after their first marriage ends. While many in Virginia may feel lucky to have found love again following a death or divorce, the legal issues surrounding second marriages can be more complex than those regarding a person's first marriage. This is especially true when it comes to estate planning.

How can a divorce affect a Virginian's estate plan?

Some married couples in Virginia may have executed an estate plan together, never anticipating that one day their union may end. However, divorce is reality for many couples in the U.S. When a couple divorces, in addition to resolving their divorce legal issues, they may also want to review their estate plan, and revise it when necessary.

Give your loved ones the gift of estate planning this season

As 2018 draws to a close and 2019 is upon us, it is a time of reflection. As a person takes stock of their life, what they've done and what they wish for the future and beyond, one thing that they may want to contemplate is executing an estate plan. A well-rounded estate plan can protect you and your loved ones should you become incapacitated, and it can ensure your assets will be handed down to your chosen heirs once you pass on.

Why is it so important to create an estate plan?

No one really wants to think about their death. However, death will come to all of us sooner or later. Through estate planning, we can address issues such as inheritances, end-of-life care and more. However, for a variety of reasons, not everyone in Virginia has executed an estate plan. But, they may want to consider doing so, for the benefit of themselves and their loved ones.

Business succession is an important part of estate planning

Many successful entrepreneurs in Virginia have spent years cultivating a business from the ground up. They may take great pride in their work, and they may have the intention of handing the reins of the business over to their children once they pass away. However, despite these good intentions, many do not have a business succession plan as part of their estate planning portfolio.

Including a health care directive in your estate plan

No one in Virginia really wants to think about their death, but it is a simple fact that one day we all will die. It may be of some comfort, then, to know that you can determine what kind of end-of-life care you want and who you want to act upon your behalf once you cannot do so on your own. This can be done through a health care directive and a living will.

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Coates & Davenport, P.C.
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Richmond, VA 23230

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